Rita Rims bloody mary cup

 

There is only one socially acceptable time to drink before noon, and that is while eating brunch. Bloody Marys are popular additions to the brunch menu and have been known to help with the occasional hangover. A mixture of tomato juice, vodka, Worcestershire sauce, and spices, the drink is a favorite of many Americans.

History of the Bloody Mary

During Victorian times, health nuts would drink tomato juice as a health elixir, many times during breakfast. The consumption of the smashed tomatoes was thought to have many health benefits. Around the 1920s, a bartender in Paris was trying to make use of the newly arrived vodka from Russian immigrants. Unsure how to mix it, he attempted a concoction of vodka and tomato juice and the Bloody Mary was born.

Prohibition

Bloody Marys became especially popular during Prohibition, as the recipe had made its way across the Atlantic. Most booze during Prohibition was low quality, which made tomato juice a great mixture to cover the taste. Tomatoes were much more readily available during this time than oranges, so mimosas lost out to the popularity of Bloody Marys.

Brunch

In 1895, an author named Guy Beringer wrote an essay entitled “Brunch: A Plea.” The essay was written as a plea to create a Sunday late-morning meal to appeal to those who have slept in due to hangovers. Thus, the idea caught on and the term brunch was coined.

Bloody Marys for Brunch

Brunch is often regarded as a wealthy, decadent meal. Rich dishes of exotic foods were always a hit, which made alcohol consumption during the meal popular during Prohibition. What could make a meal more decadent and exotic than an illegal substance? Consuming juices at breakfast and brunch were already popular, so adding Bloody Marys into the mix was not a far stretch.

Bloody Marys are still popular brunch time indulgences, especially for those wanting to follow up a night out with the hair of the dog. Whatever recipe you happen to use, be sure it has celery and other elaborate garnishes before serving. The more exotic the drink looks, the more socially acceptable it will be to have more than one at 10 a.m.

 

Sources:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/30181/genius-who-invented-brunch

https://www.eater.com/2015/6/13/8673499/bloody-mary-explainer-history-variations

https://www.thrillist.com/drink/nation/why-we-drink-bloody-marys-at-brunch